Friday, May 4, 2018

Russell, Slay, Allen, Stevens, Martin, Futch in old MS Newspapers


Generation One:  Grandparents and their siblings:

1921, 20 January. Hazlehurst Courier
Slay-Stevens
The wedding of Miss Beulah Stevens to Mr. George D. Slay was quietly celebrated January 15, at the Baptist parsonage in Hazlehurst.
These are among the most popular young people in our community.  Miss Stevens has been teaching music in Arkansas for the past two years.  Mr. Slay holds a responsible position.
Mr. and Mrs. Slay left immediately for their future home in Meadville, carrying with them the good wishes of their many friends.

1936, 4 April. Clarion-Ledger
Slay Obsequies Held in Copiah
Hazlehurst, April 3.  Funeral services for Mrs. Dewey Slay, age 38, who died at the family residence in the Shady Grove community after an illness of several weeks, were held at the Shady Grove Baptist church with Rev. A.A. Kitchens, a former pastor officiating, assisted by Rev. Geo. P. White.  Interment followed in the Hazlehurst cemetery.
While Mrs. Slay had been ill for several weeks her condition did not become serious until Monday.  Mrs. Slay was a native of Copiah County and a member of a well known family.  She was a member of the Shady Grove Baptist church.
She is survived by her husband and six small children, Dewey, Jr., Steven Glen, Guy Nell, Rose, Retha Ann, and Cuba Carroll; and several brothers and sisters, Roland Stevens, Vergil Stevens, and Carroll Stevens of Hazlehurst, Rev. Charles Stevens, Walnut Grove and Robert Stevens, Union Church, Mrs. W.D. Chadwick, Wesson.

1918, 7 Nov., Hazlehurst Courier
Mrs. Cuba Slay Ainsworth, wife of Fred Ainsworth, died Sunday, November 3rd, 1918, about one o’clock in the afternoon.  She died of pneumonia, following an attack of the [Spanish] influenza.
This is one of the saddest deaths recorded in our county during the days of so much sorrow to so many of our families.  The beloved young woman was the picture of health and happiness only a few days ago, and it is heart-breaking to think that her joyful spirit is stilled by death.  This great comfort and consolation remains, however: She was a sincere and consistent church member, and a faithful follower of the lowly Nazarene, and while her eyes are closed to earthly scenes, they are opened to the greater beauties and joys of the home built with mortal hands.
Mrs. Ainsworth was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Slay.  She and Mr. Fred Ainsworth were married about a year ago.  To the young husband, himself on a bed of sickness, and to the hosts of relatives and dear friends, the tenderest sympathy of our community goes out in full measure.

1923, 16 Nov., The Osceola Times
FOR SALE – A Lyon & Healy player-piano.  Original cost, $750.00.  Will sell for $400.00, or will accept second hand Ford car in trade.  R.H. Stevens, McFerrin, Arkansas.  Telephone No. 803F13.


Generation 2:  Great-grandparents and their siblings:
1922, 22 Aug., Jackson Daily News
Prominent Copiah Man Dies
Hazlehurst, Aug. 28 – D.A. Slay, familiarly called “Sandy” Slay, died at his home near here early yesterday morning, the cause being paralysis of the heart.  He was 53 years of age, and one of the leading citizens of the eastern part of the county, and always took an active part in religious, civic, and educational matters of his community, and for years had been president of the board of trustees of Shady Grove consolidated school.  He leaves a wife and [seven] children.  His body was laid to rest in [Hazlehurst] cemetery.

1922, 7 Sept., Hazlehurst Courier
Card of Thanks
We desire to express our profound gratitude to friends and neighbors who were so kind, thoughtful and helpful to us in our bereavement following the death of our husband and father.  We especially extend thanks for the floral offerings, beautiful expressions of sympathy and friendship.
Mrs. Sandy Slay and children

1936, 29 April, Clarion-Ledger
City News – Miss Rosa Slay of the Copiah county town of Hazlehurst, spent several days recently with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Burl Young of this city.

1937, 4 Nov., Copiah County News
Mrs. Rosa Slay Passes Wednesday
Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2:30 in the Shady Grove Baptist Church for Mrs. Rosa Slay, aged 61, who passed away Wednesday night after a short illness.  Rev. S.B. Harrington, pastor, assisted by Bryan Simmons, former pastor and lifelong friend of the Slay family; Rev. George P. White; and Rev. H. Clegg of Brookhaven will officiate.  Interment will be made in the Hazlehurst cemetery.
Surviving are several children, five boys, Hulon of Crystal Springs, Dewey, Beryl and Harold of Hazlehurst; and Robert of Belzoni, 2 daughters, Mrs. Vivian Beasley of Hazlehurst and Mrs. Burrell Young of Jackson; her mother, Mrs. S.E. Russell; 4 sisters, Mrs. Ella Young, Mrs. A.H. Ainsworth, and Mrs. Cola Ainsworth of Hazlehurst; and Mrs. Mary Myers of Mobile, Ala., one brother, Mr. G.W. Russell of Hazlehurst.
Active pall bearers will be D.L. King, L.K. Gandy, C.H. Bass, H.D. Granberry, J.L. Watson, and W.A. Miller; Honorary pall bearers will be C.B. Rea, Sol Sherman, Robert Wade, S.P. Perrett, W.C. McManus, and Phil Amos.

1924, 12 June, Hazlehurst Courier
Guy Stevens, Good Citizen, Passes Away
Mr. Guy Stevens, a splendid citizen of the county died Tuesday of last week and laid to rest the following day.  Mr. Stevens had been in Failing health for more than a year.  Everything that medical skill and kind attention could do was done for his relief.
Mr. Stevens bore his long illness with unflinching courage, and complained less than some of us who have only minor ailments.  The Courier tenders its profound sympathy to the bereaved family.

1927, 16 June, The Courier
Mrs. Bettye Allen Stevens
Mrs. Bettye Allen Stevens was born July 3rd, 1868, near Hazlehurst.  All her life was spent among the scenes of her childhood.  On March 30, 1888, she was united in marriage to Guy Stevens, a home boy.  To them God gave eight children, all of whom were at her bedside except the baby, who died 21 years ago. Her children living are:  R.L. Stevens of Fayette, Miss.; V.L., R.H. and W.C. Stevens of Hazlehurst; Chas. Stevens of Canton, and two daughters, Mrs. G.D. Slay and Mattye of Hazlehurst.
Mr. and Mrs. Stevens were very lovingly known as Mr. Guy and Mrs. Bettye by those who knew them best.  They spent 36 years of usefulness together.  Just three years ago he preceded her to that far-away home of the soul.
After his going she spent the remainder of her life in service to her children and others.  The night was never too dark for her to lend a helping hand to those in trouble.
She was a member of the Sardis Baptist church for 46 years.  Her health kept her away for some years.  She seemed as well as usual up to a week of her death, when she fell in the yard of her home.  She realized from the first that her life’s work was almost finished.  She knew not a fear, for she knew “in whom she believed.”  People far and near have been touched by the testimony made for her God in her last days.  She had lived such a life that her last thoughts were not of herself but of those dearer to her than life.  She called her children to her bedside to bid them a last good-bye, and tell them the way in which to meet mother again.
She passed away Thursday night, May 26th, ever so gently, and was buried Friday in the Sardis cemetery by the side of loved ones.  The beautiful floral offerings and the many people who gathered to pay last respects to her, expressed more deeply than words the way in which she was loved. 
One who Loved Her.

Also, later in 1927
Card of Thanks
We wish to thank the many friends and relatives who were to faithful to us during the illness of our mother, Mrs. Bettye Stevens.  We cannot express in words our gratefulness, but we trust that God in his own good way will bless and reward every kindness extended.
Her Children


Generation 3:  Great-great-grandparents and their siblings

1938, 3 Nov., Hazlehurst Courier
Mrs. Russell Is Honored On Her 86 Anniversary
The home of Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Russell was the scene of a happy occasion last Sunday afternoon when children, grandchildren and friends of Mrs. S.E. Russell [Rosa Slay’s mother] gathered to honor her eighty-sixth birthday.  At the noon hour dinner was served to forty guests in picnic fashion on the spacious lawn.  A feature of the dinner was a beautifully decorated cake holding the eighty-six candles which had been made by Mrs. C.H. Bass and presented to Mrs. Russell.
At one o’clock over radio station WSLI, the song “In the Land Where We Never Grow Old,” dedicated by Mrs. Vivian Beasley in memory of her mother, was heard.  Another feature on the program was a solo of “Mother of Mine” sung by Rev. S.B. Harrington, accompanied by Mrs. Harrington.

1916, Feb. 24., Hazlehurst Courier
Mr. Fletcher Russell 
Fletcher Russell was born in Escambia County, Ala., Dec. 6, 1846, and died at the residence of his son, George Russell, last Sunday, Feb. 20, 1916.  When quite young he removed with his family to Louisiana.  In 1869 they came to Lawrence County, Miss.  In 1880 he became a resident of Copiah where he established his home and brought up a large and honorable family.  His venerable mother still lives in the old Lawrence County community, now Jefferson Davis County.  Soon after coming to Copiah, Mr. Russell was married to Miss Lizzie Bass, of the Damascus community. The fruit of this marriage was six daughters and one son, all of whom survive except a daughter.  For the greater part of these years Mr. Russell and family lived about three miles east of Hazlehurst, where he was most highly esteemed by his good neighbors.  On the failure of health he sold part of his farm and lived in Hazlehurst, and subsequently with his son or on an adjoining place in the Shady Grove community.
During the last months of his protracted illness he enjoyed the tender ministrations of his son’s family in their hospitable home.  All that could be done by best physicians, kindred and friends was done to make his last days most comfortable.  He greatly appreciated the constant attention and cordial services of neighbors and friends.
Such devotion is an expression of the high esteem in which he was held and at the same time an evidence of the thoughtfulness, genuine friendship and fine Christian sentiment of the community.
Mr. Russell was a plain, unpretentious man.  He was a tiller of the soil and ate the bread of honest toil.  By his industry and frugality he was able to take care of a large family.  Today they rise up and call him blessed.  He was a quiet citizen and attended to his own affairs.  He was honest in his purposes and conduct. He had clear-cut views of his own and he held conservatively to his own principles because he believed them to be right.
He believed in the church, in the Bible, in prayer, and in a godly life.  He was a firm, lifelong Methodist.  He stood honored and respected among his neighbors because of his consistency.  He was modest and retiring, tolerant and charitable. 
For the past four months he was fully aware that he was nearing the end of his earthly pilgrimage.  He had long days and long nights for thoughtful meditation.  When ministers and other good Christians visited him it was his pleasure to hear the Scriptures read and talked about.  He loved their prayers.  He had a vision of the Saviour welcoming him into the heavenly world.  His mind was serene and clear almost to the end.  He had a blessed assurance of acceptance and humbly asserted his joyous assurance.  Trusting the Saviour he was ready to go.
Those who knew him for a whole generation bear their testimony to the character of a good man.  He will be missed in the loving circle of family and friends.
A large company on a busy day of the week assembled at the house to pay the tribute of their esteem, honor and affection to the memory of a friend and neighbor.  Simple, appropriate services were conducted by Rev. B.F. Lewis in which Pastors of the Baptist and Presbyterian churches took part.
The remains were tenderly and reverently laid to rest in the City Cemetery Monday afternoon.


1936, 23 April, Prentiss Headlight
MR. J. B. RUSSELL PASSES  [Fletcher Russell’s brother]
          Mr. J. B. Russell, life-long resident of Jefferson Davis county, died in the Berry Hospital, Prentiss, Monday, after an illness following a general decline in his death. He was 87 years of age in March and death was due to general debility with complications. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning from Mt. Zion church, conducted by his pastor, the Rev. L. L. Roberts. Burial was made in the Mt. Zion cemetery by the side of his good wife, who preceded him to the grave eight years. Pall-bearers were Messrs. W. J. Hubbard, W. H. Mathison, Guy Milley, I. F. Dale, R. C. Williams and Dr. J. N. Mathison.
          As stated, Mr. Russell was over 87 years of age. He was born back in the late 40's and had lived through this Republic's most tragic eras. As a boy he heard the tramping of soldiers marching to and from battle. He was too young to enter the Southern army, but he felt the sting of poverty and want that followed in the wake of the saturnalia of wrong inflicted upon a defenseless people.
          Mr. Russell was one of the most successful farmers and business men ever reared in south Mississippi. He had but little opportunity for formal education, but he acquired much knowledge from study and reading. He began life with nothing, and amassed considerable wealth by thrift and careful management. As a dirt farmer, he had no superior anywhere, and made his fortune from the soil and good business judgment, of which he was blessed most wonderfully. He was for many years president of the Bank of Blountville and his judgment in these matters was always sound and showed much study and financial genius. He was a great reader and one might find him any day in his latter years on the porch of his home with all his papers and magazines about him.
          Too, he had a dash of adventure about him. Some years ago when the pilot of an airplane offered a banter to take him up for a flight, the aged gentleman, then rounding out 80 years, with a glint of steel in his eyes, responded that he would be glad to go, and he did. He was built that way; steady in his thoughts, marvelously balanced in his emotions.
          Mr. Russell was a good man. He was true as steel. His word was as good as his bond. He owed no man that he did not pay. He was generous to the unfortunate and was companionable and hospitable in his home. We shall miss him. Peace to his ashes and glory to his soul.
          Surviving are two children, Prof. Charles Russell and Mrs. Percy Dumas; one brother, William Russell, Hazlehurst; as well as several grandchildren, including Mrs. C. S. Dumas, Mrs. Shirley Blanks, Russell Dumas and Miss Bennie Dumas, to all of whom we extend our sympathy.


1925
Fine Citizen Dies Suddenly Sunday
The community was shocked Sunday morning when the news spread that Mr. Dan J. Martin [Amanda Martin Slay’s brother] was dead.  Few of his friends knew he was sick, and no one thought the end was near.
Mr. Martin went about his regular duties until Wednesday of last week.  He complained of not feeling well, and rested the remainder of the week, although he made one or two trips down town.  He slept late Sunday morning, but was talking with a neighbor across the division fence, and remarked that he felt better.  He was suddenly stricken with heart trouble, and lived but a few hours. Fortunately his daughter, Mrs. H.M. Garland and Mr. Garland of Summit, were guests in the home at the time.
Mr. Dan Martin was in his 78th year.  He was, if our information is correct, born and reared in what is now the Spring Hill community, and was the son of James Martin, whose place lay between what is now known as the Goodbar place and the old B.F. Martin place.  He attended the Spring Hill school, taught by such men as Frank Sessions, Prof. Williams, and Dr. R.W. Rea.  He served in the militia during the closing months of the war under the command of B.F. Martin.
More than a quarter century ago he came to Hazlehurst to make his home, his first business connection being with the Burnley Drug Co., then with John B. Mayes and then with the J.Q. Martin mercantile establishment.  All his former employers bear high testimony to his integrity, his efficiency and his unfailing cheerfulness and good temper.
Mr. Martin was a member of the Hazlehurst Baptist church.  He was a sincere and devout Christian, a modest and true gentleman.  His home life was ideal.  He lived for those he loved. 
Looking back over his long life, we are impressed that he lived worthily and was ready for the summons.  It seems to us fitting that he should go without long-drawn out illness, in full possession of his physical and mental powers.  Surviving him are his wife, whose maiden name was Sallie Guynes, and six daughters, Mesdames R.L. Dent, J.C. Hallman, J.R. Herrington, Henry French, H.M. Garland and Miss Carolyn Martin; and three sons, Messrs. Silas and D.J. Martin of Clarksdale and Mr. Ben Martin of Hazlehurst.


1910, October 20, Hazlehurst Courier
Transcribed by Bradley Jeffreys
Death of a Good Woman
Mrs. Martha Miller died at the family home near Gallman Saturday night, October 15th, 1910, in the 85th year of her age.
Mrs. Miller was a truly good woman.  She was wise in counsel and tender and quick in sympathy.  All her days were spent in Copiah County.  She was the daughter and oldest child of Sandy Slay, one of the pioneer citizens of Northeast Copiah - a vigorous, active, strong man – a leader in his day and time in every worthy undertaking.  Her husband was the lamented William Miller, who preceded her in death about twenty years.
The children who survive her are:  J.L. Miller and Mrs. L.L. Brittain of Hazlehurst; Mrs. W.J. Hampton of Crystal Springs; Mrs. J.M. Shivers of Poplarville; and two daughters who made their home with their mother at the time of her death.
Mrs. Miller, at the time of her death, was a member of the Gallman Baptist church.  She had been a consistent member of the Baptist church since early girlhood.  She appropriated to her own life the teachings of the Great Teacher, and lived her religion day by day in humility and serenity.  Her fortitude, wisdom and faith met every vicissitude of life calmly and wisely.  The clouds were never so dark but that she could see a silver lining.
Mrs. Miller will be greatly missed in her community by neighbors and friends, but the loss falls heaviest upon the members of her own family, who through long years have had in her comforter, friend and counselor.  To these The Courier extends its profound sympathy.


1921, December 2, The Meteor
Judge A.D. Slay Goes to His Reward
The popular and highly esteemed citizen passed from time into eternity Tuesday morning, the 29th instant, at 9:40 o’clock, in the 74th year of his age.  [Uncle Alonzo Slay]
It is a sorrowful editorial duty to be called upon to chronicle the demise of a citizen who has occupied a luminous and influential position in town life and affairs, but the sorrow felt is tinged with the pleasure derived from lauding a life and character so preeminently honorable, exemplary and useful.  He was not esteemed for the position he occupied but for the virtues he exemplified – integrity, high mindedness, rectitude of conduct.  In all the relations of life, in the family, in the church, on the bench, he was the same of fable gentleman, genial, kind hearted, well-poised.  He was a fine type of the old school of Southern gentlemen.  He towered high in the councils of his church and for more than two decades presided over the destinies of the Sunday school.  The infirmities of old age forced him to relinquish a position which he filled with singular appreciation by the children whom he directed in the way of Christian life.
He was seized with an affection of the heart Thanksgiving Day.  This attack was complicated with other serious maladies, which caused him to sink rapidly, the end coming Tuesday morning.  He recognized that “Death’s but a path that must be trod, If man would ever pass to God,” hence he did not dread the great adventure that all must make sooner or later.
An idea of the popularity and esteem in which the deceased was held may be inferred from the fact that he was serving his sixth consecutive term as justice of the peace of this district – an office which he held against all comers, the duties appertaining to which he discharged with that judicial poise of mind that distinguished his career on the bench.  He was a born jurist and had he had the advantages of an early education he would have been an outstanding figure in expounding the jurisprudence of the state.
Business was suspended Wednesday with the result that an immense throng assembled at the Baptist church to render homage to the virtue of the dead citizen.
The interment took place in the city cemetery.
Peace to the ashes of the dead comrade who wore and adorned the grey.
Out of respect of the memory of the late Justice A.D. Slay, circuit court adjourned for one hour and a half Wednesday morning.  Judge D.M. Miller, District Attorney Hugh Barr Miller, Sheriff Henry E. Ramsey and Circuit Clerk C.B. Rea attended the funeral services in the Baptist church, where a capacity congregation heard the sorrowful funeral rites pronounced over the bier of one of the county’s most exemplary and useful citizens.

A newspaper clipping from 1864, found in Scrapbook of J. L. Powers [Z10742.000], housed in Mississippi Department of Archives and History:
Captain E. Slay
Captain E. [Elijah] Slay, company C, 16th Mississippi regiment, was killed, at Cold Harbor, on the 10th June, 1864.
He was born the 8th of June, 1838, in Copiah county, Mississippi, and was the son of Alexander and Elizabeth Slay.  When his state, by ordinance of secession, severed her connection with the United States Government, and it became manifest that a war was inevitable, Capt. Slay was among the first to enroll his name as one of her defenders.  He attached himself, as a private, to company C, 16th Mississippi regiment, which was organized in March 1861, and was amongst the first companies called into service.  He served as a private for the period of one year, with marked gallantry.  He participated in all the engagements with his regiment, including the noted campaign of Jackson in the Valley.
At the reorganization of his company, April 1862, he was chosen Captain of the company, a post he afterwards proved himself eminently qualified for.  He was dangerously wounded at Gettysburg, and captured by the enemy, but subsequently made his escape and rejoined his command.
            Capt. Slay’s services to his country have been exceedingly valuable and he often received the commendations of his superior officers, including Gen. Lee, for reliable information when sent out as a scout, as was often the case, to penetrate the designs of the enemy.  He was beloved by his command and by all who knew him.  As a soldier, he was fearless and intrepid; as a husband, kind and affectionate; as a citizen and neighbor he possessed all the qualities that are estimable in a man.  His country has lost a good officer, and the community a good citizen.  He had long been a member of the Baptist Church, and lived up to the character of the true Christian gentleman.
He lies buried at the “Gaines’ House,” in the shades of the Old Dominion.  His funeral was attended by a few weeping friends, and appropriate religious services were held by the Rev. Mr. Lomax, Chaplain of the Regiment.
A Companion.
[Old Dominion was a common nickname for Virginia]


A single 1896 newspaper clipping found tucked in a minute book at Sardis Baptist church
In Memoriam of our dearly beloved brother, S.J. Allen
Brother Allen was born August 7, 1832 in Copiah County, Miss.  He was married to Miss Margaret M. Fulgham May 31, 1855.  She died about the year 1875.  He married again June 22, 1877, Mrs. N.E. Brown.  He as baptized in the fellowship of Sardis Baptist Church August 29, 1878, where he remained a devoted member until his death.  His second wife died April 18, 1891.
Brother Allen died April 5, 1896.  He was an earnest Christian, ever on the side of right on all questions, a bright and shining light, and a power for good in the church.  He was a devoted husband, and a loving father, and among his brethren here he was honored and influential and to see him and to hear him was to love him.  His influence and presence will be missed among us, and his power will not be felt here as in the past.
Brethren and sisters, let us profit by the example of our worthy brother has set, and while we mourn for the loss we have sustained, let us ever remember that our loss is his gain, and let us so live that we may meet our Brother in that Beauty Land.
J.B. Middleton, Walter Beall, J.J. McCardle, Committee.

Generation 4:  Great-great-great-grandparents
1878, Hazlehurst Copiahan
Alexander Slay
Died, at the residence of his son-in-law, William Miller, five miles northeast of Hazlehurst, on the 11th day of March, 1878, of cancer, Alexander Slay, aged about seventy-two years.  If we mistake not he was born in Wayne County, this state [incorrect: Chesterfield County, SC], near the old town of Winchester, at which place the writer first knew him, and have known him intimately ever since up to the time of his death.
Deceased had many good traits of character and as few faults as any other.  He was a good citizen, a true and devoted Christian, always ready to do his Master’s will, an affectionate and devoted husband, a kind and indulgent father, and a neighbor in the true sense of the term.  But, alas, he is no more, he has paid the debt that we all will have to pay, sooner or later.  Farewell!  Farewell!  This is not intended as an obituary, we will leave that to one more gifted than ourself.
H.

1872, 2 Nov., Tennessee Baptist
OBITUARY
Died, October 14, 1872, in the sixty-sixth year of her age, Elizabeth, wife of Alexander Slay, of Copiah County, Mississippi.  She was Baptized, together with her husband into the fellowship of the Steen’s Creek Baptist Church, Rankin County, Mississippi, in 1831, and lived a faithful and devoted Christian.  A woman of the most unfeigned kindness toward all; many now remember of her that never was an unkind word toward any person heard to escape her lips.  In peace with all, she peacefully passed to the rest that remains for the people of God.  “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.”
W.H.H.


A birthday, a wedding and a funeral all in a year
1901, 13 Jan., The Vicksburg Herald
Raymond News Items 
On Tuesday, Mr. J.M. Futch, an old citizen of this town, celebrated his 90th birthday.  He was waited upon by a committee of the Masonic lodge, of which he has long been a member.

1901, 10 Nov., The Vicksburg Herald
Raymond Happenings
Mr. H. Eastland and Miss Emma Bedwell were married on Wednesday evening at the residence of the bride’s uncle, Mr. J.M. Futch.  The groom is a prominent going business man of Forest, Miss., and the bride is a most charming and popular young lady of Raymond society, and is the daughter of Jno. G. Bedwell, one of the most substantial citizens of the community.


1901, 17 Nov., The Vicksburg Herald
An Old Citizen Dead – Just as we are going to press we learn of the death of Mr. J.M. Futch, the oldest citizen of the town, who has for some time been in declining health.  He lived a long and useful life and his passing away is regretted by a large circle of friends.
Raymond Gazette

Monday, February 6, 2017

Transcribed by Bradley Jeffreys, February 6, 2017
From the family bible of John Linton Slay (1833-1902), and wife, Permelia Ann Puckett Slay, of Clarke County, Mississippi
________________________
April the 1st, 1865

According to a Proclimation issued by President Lincoln, the following Negro Slaves owned by me was set free, to wit

Ann       36 years of age
Lucy      20     "
Rachel   20     "
Sarah     14     "
Mary      14     "
Law        12     "
Franey      7     "
Saley        5     "
John         2     "
Lewis       2     "

Witness my hand and seal this this April the 1st 1865
attest
P. A. Slay                                                         J. L. Slay


Sunday, February 5, 2017

Death of Alonzo D. Slay
Transcribed by Bradley Jeffreys, February 5, 2017
The Meteor (Crystal Springs, Miss.)
1921, December 2


Judge A. D. Slay Goes to His Reward


   The popular and highly esteemed citizen passed from time into eternity Tuesday morning, the 29th instant, at 9:40 o’clock, in the 74th year of his age.
   It is a sorrowful editorial duty to be called upon to chronicle the demise of a citizen who has occupied a luminous and influential position in town life and affairs, but the sorrow felt is tinged with the pleasure derived from lauding a life and character so preeminently honorable, exemplary and useful.  He was not esteemed for the position he occupied but for the virtues he exemplified – integrity, high mindedness, rectitude of conduct.  In all the relations of life, in the family, in the church, on the bench, he was the same of fable gentleman, genial, kind hearted, well-poised.  He was a fine type of the old school of Southern gentlemen.  He towered high in the councils of his church and for more than two decades presided over the destinies of the Sunday school.  The infirmities of old age forced him to relinquish a position which he filled with singular appreciation by the children whom he directed in the way of Christian life.
   He was seized with an affection of the heart Thanksgiving Day.  This attack was complicated with other serious maladies, which caused him to sink rapidly, the end coming Tuesday morning.  He recognized that “Death’s but a path that must be trod, If man would ever pass to God,” hence he did not dread the great adventure that all must make sooner or later.
   An idea of the popularity and esteem in which the deceased was held may be inferred from the fact that he was serving his sixth consecutive term as justice of the peace of this district – an office which he held against all comers, the duties appertaining to which he discharged with that judicial poise of mind that distinguished his career on the bench.  He was a born jurist and had he had the advantages of an early education he would have been an outstanding figure in expounding the jurisprudence of the state.
   Business was suspended Wednesday with the result that an immense throng assembled at the Baptist church to render homage to the virtue of the dead citizen.
   The interment took place in the city cemetery.
   Peace to the ashes of the dead comrade who wore and adorned the grey.
    Out of respect of the memory of the late Justice A. D. Slay, circuit court adjourned for one hour and a half Wednesday morning.  Judge D. M. Miller, District Attorney Hugh Barr Miller, Sheriff Henry E. Ramsey and Circuit Clerk C. B. Rae attended the funeral services in the Baptist church, where a capacity congregation heard the sorrowful funeral rites pronounced over the bier of one of the county’s most exemplary and useful citizens.
Transcribed by Bradley Jeffreys February 5, 2017
Hazlehurst Courier (Hazlehurst, Mississippi)
October 20, 1910

Death of a Good Woman
Mrs. Martha Miller died at the family home near Gallman Saturday night, October 15th, 1910, in the 85th year of her age.
Mrs. Miller was a truly good woman.  She was wise in counsel and tender and quick in sympathy.  All her days were spent in Copiah County.  She was the daughter and oldest child of Sandy Slay, one of the pioneer citizens of Northeast Copiah - a vigorous, active, strong man – a leader in his day and time in every worthy undertaking.  Her husband was the lamented William Miller, who preceded her in death about twenty years.
The children who survive her are:  J.L. Miller and Mrs. L.L. Brittain of Hazlehurst; Mrs. W.J. Hampton of Crystal Springs; Mrs. J.M. Shivers of Poplarville; and two daughters who made their home with their mother at the time of her death.
Mrs. Miller, at the time of her death, was a member of the Gallman Baptist Church.  She had been a consistent member of the Baptist church since early girlhood.  She appropriated to her own life the teachings of the Great Teacher, and lived her religion day by day in humility and serenity.  Her fortitude, wisdom and faith met every vicissitude of life calmly and wisely.  The clouds were never so dark but that she could see a silver lining.
Mrs. Miller will be greatly missed in her community by neighbors and friends, but the loss falls heaviest upon the members of her own family, who through long years have had in her comforter, friend and counselor.  To these The Courier extends its profound sympathy.
1921 Marriage Announcement
Hazlehurst Courier (Hazlehurst, Miss.) 1921, January 20.

SLAY - STEVENS
     The wedding of Miss Beulah Stevens to Mr. George D. Slay was quietly celebrated January 15, at the Baptist Parsonage in Hazlehurst.
     These are among the most popular young people in our community.  Miss Stevens has been teaching music in Arkansas for the past two years.  Mr. Slay holds a responsible position.
     Mr. and Mrs. Slay left immediately for their future home in Meadville, carrying with them the good wishes of their many friends.

    


Monday, February 22, 2016

Alfred Slay Family Record 1799-1885

This is the Alfred Slay and Nancy Collins Family Record, beginning with Alfred's birth in 1799, and ending with the recording of the death of their son Thomas Jefferson Slay in 1885







Monday, January 12, 2015

ELIJAH SLAY, son of Alexander Slay, Sr. and Elizabeth (McLean) Slay

Captain, Co. C, 16th Mississippi Infantry - "Crystal Springs Southern Rights Rifles"


Battle of Cold Harbour, Virginia

The following letters and notes written by Capt. Elijah Slay in 1862-3 were transcribed by Frances (Matthews) Liptrap.  Dr. George Edgar "Ed" Jones of Madison, Mississippi also made comments and gave the materials to Brad Jeffreys, Slay researcher.

~above photos are examples of Confederate Captain uniforms

~below are transcriptions of letters and notes written by Capt Elijah Slay

 a re-enactment of the situation where Capt Elijah Slay was killed by a mini-ball in the chest at Cold Harbor, Virginia













 re-burial of soldiers killed during the Battle of Cold Harbor